Walling Family Reunion

The waiter was not impressed. I motioned towards my lunch companion and said, “Her grandmother and my great grandmother were sisters.” He paused and said, “Say that again.” So I did. “Oh. Can I get you started with some beverages today?” It didn’t…

The waiter was not impressed.  I motioned towards my lunch companion and said, “Her grandmother and my great grandmother were sisters.” 

He paused and said, “Say that again.” So I did.

“Oh. Can I get you started with some beverages today?”

Continue reading “Walling Family Reunion”

Family History Library, Take 2 [Scene 2]

Here are the five biggest arenas of discovery and ensuing analysis resulting from my second trip to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. I make note of them to form a (very public!) post-ProGen-proof-argument-assignment-work plan. That’s …

Here are the five biggest arenas of discovery and ensuing analysis resulting from my second trip to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.  I make note of them to form a (very public!) post-ProGen-proof-argument-assignment-work plan. That’s due at the end of February and I have to keep my eye on the prize for now.  But I can’t wait to dive into… Continue reading “Family History Library, Take 2 [Scene 2]”

Ancestor Approved

Thanks to my friend and ProGen peer Shelley for passing the Ancestor Approved blog award baton from her blog, A Sense of Family, to Family Epic. And thanks to Leslie Ann of Ancestors Live Here who created the award early in 2010. Recipients are as…

Ancestor_approved

Thanks to my friend and ProGen peer Shelley for passing the Ancestor Approved blog award baton from her blog, A Sense of Family, to Family Epic.  And thanks to Leslie Ann of Ancestors Live Here who created the award early in 2010. 

Recipients are asked to post a list of ten things learned about their ancestors that have been humbling, surprising or enlightening.  It’s a great mental organizing task, one that genealogists embrace – this time of year especially.  Continue reading “Ancestor Approved”

“Yes! I was a soldier in the civil war between the States….”

Thus begins a “simple statement of my ‘War Record'” penned by George Washington Walling, Sr. a few years before his death in 1916, at the request of his son Thomas Burrowes Walling. (1) This document is one piece of the Walling Papers, the discove…

Thus begins a “simple statement of my ‘War Record'” penned by George Washington Walling, Sr. a few years before his death in 1916, at the request of his son Thomas Burrowes Walling. (1)

This document is one piece of the Walling Papers, the discovery that I wrote about here. Below is the entire transcription, but I’ve also included a digital image of one line with an illegible word (at least to me!) If anyone has any idea of what that last word is, please comment with your thoughts.  It feels like a critical word in an important sentence.

This is the first ancestral civil war narrative I’ve read that was not part of pension application file.  In other words, its purpose was not to highlight physical infirmities suffered on account of service.  (From that standpoint, it’s refreshing.)  Nor does it glorify participation.  It’s just a matter of  fact.

Continue reading ““Yes! I was a soldier in the civil war between the States….””

Putting the Wright Name with Faces

I have many – mostly small – family photographs that are unlabelled, and beyond that, not even associated with a particular side of the family. I’ve already commented on my “provenance” challenges. But the pictures of this couple were di…

I have many – mostly small – family photographs that are unlabelled, and beyond that, not even associated with a particular side of the family.  I’ve already commented on my “provenance” challenges.  But the pictures of this couple were different — fairly new reproductions on Kodak paper sitting among tintypes and daguerreotypes.  But I still didn’t know who they were. You can see them below.

I wasn’t even looking for them when I took aim at one of the holes on my pedigree chart.  Cora Walling’s mother was named Louisa and most of  what I knew about her was uncovered by Elise when she interviewed Mom while working on a 5th grade school project.  Continue reading “Putting the Wright Name with Faces”

You might find a chart helpful

This pedigree chart (and by that, I don’t mean “high- falutin’ “) may make the posts easier to follow….. If anyone would like a copy of their own chart — as it stands now – let me know!

Mr_pedigree_chart

This pedigree chart (and by that, I don’t mean “high- falutin’ “) may make the posts easier to follow…..

If anyone would like a copy of their own chart — as it stands now – let me know!