March 24, 1971

After our early breakfast we took the “tube” to Charing Cross Station where we boarded a train that was to take us to Canterbury 56 miles from London in a South-South East direction The distance was covered in an hour and twenty-seven minutes – We…

After our early breakfast we took the “tube” to Charing Cross Station where we boarded a train that was to take us to Canterbury 56 miles from London in a South-South East direction

The distance was covered in an hour and twenty-seven minutes –

We stopped for coffee & biscuits at the “House of Agnes Hotel” of David Copperfield fame  We were served in an upstairs room much like a parlour in a British home complete with a fire in the fire place

House_of_agnes

[Editor’s Note:  I’ve looked at websites and current reviews for several of the places we visited, including the House of Agnes Hotel.  And it’s interesting here to note what a difference forty years makes in terms of marketing materials!  House of Agnes – runner-up in the “Funkiest B&B of the Year” Contest of 2010-2011. Wonder what Mom would make of that….]

Refreshed we were ready to spend several hours at Canterbury Cathedral and its Cloisters

Canterbury_cathedral

Of great interest to us was the Connection with St. Thomas Becket [Beckett] & his death in 1170 – The stained glass windows were beautiful –

We walked through the grounds of King’s School –

On down the street we saw the remains of a tiny church where Thomas Morley had been Baptized and in the vicinity a theatre called the Thomas Morley to honor the famous Elizabethan composer

Had a lunch of Steak & Kidney pie and biscuits before we climbed aboard the bus that was headed for Dover – Just a 50 minute ride – We did pass a club for “Bowling on the Green”

From the town of Dover we got a bus that took us up to Dover Castle – We were sort of alone up there (the 8 of us) for it was cold & very windy – We did see a large collection of armour in “The Keep”, the dungeons, as well as a beautiful view of the White Cliffs of Dover and the English Channel – On a clear day they told us you could see France

Dover_castle

We walked down the path to the city and the docks – We passed the ruins of the church of St. James that had been built shortly after the Norman Conquest in 1066 – The members of the Garrison at Dover as well as the Duke of Wellington worshiped here –

As we walked along the Promenade we head another view of the White Cliffs and saw the reason that Dover Castle was of such great military importance –

White_cliffs

Along our path we saw a statue of Mr. Rolls (of Rolls Royce fame) who was the first to fly across the Channel in 1910

We had dinner at “The Crypt” where our waitress put a bottle of Heinz Catsup on the table even before we ordered saying “You Americans have grown up on  it” – We all had a good old American steak, fried potatoes & ice cream – Jim couldn’t get a cup of tea – (Many places serve it only during the 4-5 o’clock tea hour – )

We raced to the R. R. Station only to discover the last fast train to London had departed an hour before & that the first slow one wouldn’t leave for another 25 minutes –

Finally comfortably aboard the ladies in one compartment – the gents in another, the train headed for London –

As our train left Dover we could see Dover Castle ablaze with lights as it stands there atop the white cliffs – A memorable sight –

It was 10:10 p.m. when we got back to London – It had been a long, long day but we made a last stop at the Glass & Cask Pub to plan how we could best spend our last full day in London – So much yet to do & so little time!  While here Jim did get instruction on how to play Darts as played in some Pubs – Also we were told of a cider that is served in some Pubs that is be avoided – 120 proof

—————————————

Volume labeled “The Pennsylvania Lawyer’s Diary 1971”, used as travel journal by Elizabeth W. Ruffner, for a trip taken in March-April 1971; held by Malissa  Ruffner, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE], Baltimore, MD; 2011.

For background information on this series of posts, see Spring Break, 1971.

 

One thought on “March 24, 1971”

  1. Mother could tell a story — and sometimes knew what to leave out. Case in point: her entry from Scotland "the policemen were so polite and took care of everything after yesterday’s accident." But no mention of what the accident was. . .though I seem to remember hearing from Daddy that he forgot which side of the road he was to have been driving on. She certainly wouldn’t have included any mistake he made.

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